Skip to content Skip to navigation

SURIM 2021

Format

Due to the Coronavirus pandemic, SURIM 2021 will be held entirely online.

Schedule

All participants of SURIM are required to attend every event. Events marked with a "**" are also required for graduate student mentors.

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

6/21

11am: Welcome meeting

12pm: group project mentor talk, Xiaoyu He

 

6/22

11am: group project mentor talk, Max Xu

2pm-3pm: office hours, Xiaoyu He

 

 6/23

8am: group project mentor talk, Slava Naprienko

5pm-6pm: office hours, Max Xu

 6/24

9am-10am: office hours, Slava Naprienko

11am-1pm: office hours, Max Xu

 6/25

10am-11am: office hours, Slava Naprienko

2pm-3pm: office hours, Xiaoyu He

group project preference survey due

 6/26  6/27

6/28

6/29

11am: Faculty Speaker, Tadashi Tokieda

Title: applying physics to mathematics

6/30

7/1

8am: Faculty Speaker, Steve Trettel

Title: Ray Optics, Geodesics, and Curved Space

7/2

7/3

 

7/4

Independence Day

7/5

7/6

7am-8am: Pawel's office hours

8am: Graduate Student Panel,

Mark Sellke, Jonathan Love, Calista Bernard

Topic: research in mathematics

7/7

8am: Social event

7/8

8am: Faculty Speaker, Persi Diaconis

Title: THE random graph

7/9

 

7/10 7/11

7/12

6am - 11am: Individual meetings

7/13

8am: Faculty Speaker, Rafe Mazzeo

7/14

 

7/15

8am: Faculty Speaker,

Kannan Soundararajan

Title: The distribution of prime numbers

7/16 7/17 7/18
7/19

7/20

8am: Faculty Speaker, Ravi Vakil

Title: Given four lines in space, how many other lines meet all four?
From fancy linear algebra to the geometry, topology, and combinatorics of the Grassmannian

7/21

7/22

8:30am: Faculty Speaker,

Brian Conrad

Title: Fermat’s Last Theorem and elliptic curves

7/23 7/24 7/25

7/26

8am: social event, online office games

 

7/27

Individual and group midterm presentations**

7/28

 

7/29

Group midterm presentations**

7/30 7/31 8/1
8/2

8/3

8am: Graduate Student Panel: Dylan Cant, Sarah McConnell, Ipsita Datta

Topic: graduate school in mathematics

8/4

8/5

8am: Faculty Speaker, Eugenia Malinnikova

Title: Discrete Harmonic Functions

 

8/6

8am: social event, magic show by Harrison Kramer

8/7 8/8

8/9

 

8/10

8am: Faculty Speaker, Andras Vasy

Title: Wave propagation and geometric optics

8/11

8/12

8/13 8/14 8/15
8/16

8/17

8am: Faculty Speaker, Otis Chodosh,

Title: Local to global results in geometry

8/18

Final presentations**

8/19

Final presentations**

8/20

Final presentations**

written reports: first drafts due

8/21 8/22

8/23

8/24

8am: Faculty Speakar, Sourav Chatterjee,

Title: Some open questions in probability

8/25

8/26

8/27

last day of SURIM

written reports: final drafts due

 

8/28 8/29

Staff

Pawel Grzegrzolka, Director

Office:  380-382A

Email:  pawelg@stanford.edu

 

Gretchen Lantz, Student Services Manager

Office:  380-381S

Email:  glantz@stanford.edu

 

Asma Gaba, Student Services Specialist

Office:  380-381S

Email: asmagaba@stanford.edu

Graduate Student Mentors and Projects

TBD

Online Resources

How to give good mathematics talks:

How to write good mathematics papers:

Computer algebra resources:

  • SAGE — Free and open source extension to Python for advanced mathematical work/computation, can be run in-browser.
  • Pari/GP — Free, and somewhat better for abstract algebra than SAGE, but there's a somewhat steeper learning curve for the syntax. Can be run in-browser.
  • Magma — Not free, and the syntax is difficult to learn, but this is probably the most complete (non-graphical) computer algebra system. Stanford University has a site license paid for generously by the Simons Foundation, so if you would like to use it, let me know.
  • Mathematica — A more graphically-driven computer algebra system. In my experience it is particularly useful for discrete math/combinatorics, calculus/analysis, and making pretty pictures. Not free, but it can be run through Farmshare.
  • Wolfram Alpha — Useful if you want to check your work or solve a system of equations quickly.

Collaboration/productivity resources:

Github — A highly functional collaborative environment for working on documents in a group with solid version control. Free!
Overleaf — For collaboration and cloud storage of LaTeX (and other?) documents. Free for Stanford students.
Google Drive — Cloud storage. You all have accounts through Stanford, and through Gmail if you use it.
Box — Another cloud storage service. Free, I think, for Stanford.
Dropbox — Yet another cloud storage service.
Slack — A chatroom-type environment for collaborative work or just socializing. Has LaTeX compatibility.

Literature Search/References/Databases

Wikipedia — Has reasonably good coverage of mathematics.
Mathworld — An online math encyclopedia, but specialized towards certain interests and by the same company that makes Mathematica (so it will tell you how to do things in Mathematica if you're curious).
MathSciNet — The AMS' literature search engine.
Arxiv — A free online repository of scientific articles. Probably 60-70% of math articles make it to the Arxiv before publication (and most of those stay after publication as well).
Math Stack Exchange — A forum for more elementary questions.
Math Overflow — A forum for more advanced questions.
OEIS — The Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences! Possibly the most useful website ever.

Highly specialized/branch-specific databases/projects:

(Algebra) The Group Properties Wiki

(Algebraic Geometry) The Stacks Project

(Number Theory) The Number Fields Database

(Number Theory) The L-functions and Modular Forms Database